Prosecuting Evil 

Dec. 15, 2020 - Aug. 15, 2021
Online

Prosecuting Evil


The documentary tells the fascinating story of Ben Ferencz the last surviving Nuremberg prosecutor and lifelong advocate of “law not war.” At age 98 he is on a life long crusade in the fight for justice for victims of atrocity crimes continued today.

The overall objective of this course is to promote the value and best practices for human rights, equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) in our society and in Canadian organizations.

Synopsis of the case study:  At age 27 in his first case, Ben Ferencz, a Harvard-educated lawyer, prosecuted 22 men at Nuremberg—the biggest murder trial in history. Since then, Ferencz has been on a lifelong crusade to fight for justice, advocating for the establishment of an international rule of law and the International Criminal Court. In this gripping documentary, award-winning filmmaker Barry Avrich tells the story of one of the Holocaust’s most heroic figures—and one of the world’s most committed human rights lawyers—who believes, firmly in “law, not war.”

CPD focus: The experts will discuss the Holocaust as the catalyst for the rise in recognizing the need for education, human rights, justice and equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) in our world. More than six million Jews were slaughtered, whom the Nazis targeted as the priority “enemy”. They were a part of the 70-85 million people that perished as the Nazis targeted other groups for persecution, imprisonment, and annihilation also, such as the Roma (Gypsies), people with disabilities, Poles, Soviet prisoners of war, and Afro-Germans. The Nazis also identified political dissidents, Jehovah’s Witnesses, homosexuals, and so-called asocials (beggars, alcoholics, drug addicts, prostitutes, and pacifists) as enemies and security risks either because they consciously opposed the Nazi regime or some aspect of their behavior did not fit Nazi perceptions of social norms. This horror certainly served as a sharp catalyst for the need and creation of a more humane world order. As such, paving the path to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) adopted post Worwld War II by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on December 10, 1948. The experts will guide participants to gain deeper understanding for the importance of Human Rights laws and protections for humanity as a whole while studying how the Holocaust, as well as other genocides steered the path for the creation thereof. The experts will also help participants perceive the human consequences of the Holocaust and war and the dangers of forgetting history — while grasping the essence of the collective responsibility of remembrance. Dangers of racism and hate are still very much alive and prevalent in our world today, and how it is up to us to fight for peace, security, and prosperity for humanity. The experts will touch on possible solutions to counter old/new racism and Antisemitism — our collective responsibility to promote human rights and combat racism in all its forms.

Specific Learning Objectives:

  • Gain an understanding of the Holocaust as the catalyst for the rise in recognizing the need for education, human rights, justice and equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI)—the slaughter of more than six million Jews among 70-85 million of people perished, such as the Roma and those perceived as enemies by the Third Reich, certainly served as a sharp catalyst for the need and creation of a more humane world order. As such, paving the path to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) adopted post World War II by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on December 10, 1948.
  • Gain an understanding of the legacy of the Nuremberg trials (i.e., the principles of international criminal law that emerged from the International Military Tribunal and the twelve subsequent war crimes trials that served as the foundation cornerstone for a new rule of international criminal law designed to deter future aggression, genocide and other crimes against humanity).
  • Gain an understanding of the lessons learned from the Holocaust, other genocides and the importance for the need of human rights for humanity.
  • Understand the danger of racism and hate and how it impedes the quest for peace, security and prosperity for humanity.
  • Understand the human consequences of the Holocaust and the danger of forgetting history — while encouraging the collective responsibility of remembrance.
  • Understand the importance of human rights and the danger of the assault on minorities who are often vulnerable and powerless — the responsibility to protect and intervene.
  • Understand the perils of Holocaust Denial — the responsibility to repudiate false witness.
  • Understand the danger of Old/New racism and Antisemitism — the collective responsibility to promote human rights and combat racism in all its forms.
  • Discuss possible solutions to counter Old/New racism and Antisemitism.
     

 
Post-Screening Experts:


The Honourable Louise Arbour, C.C., G.O.Q.
The Honourable Irwin Cotler, PC, OC
Fannie Lafontaine, Professor, Law Faculty of Laval University
Max Eisen, Holocaust survivor and author

 

 

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    COST
    Exclusive to CBA Members: $89.99
    (compared to $199)
    Plus applicable taxes

    FEATURE FILM
    Prosecuting Evil (a film by Barry Avrich)

    DURATION
    Feature film: 83 minutes
    Post-screening panel discussion: 97 minutes

    PROGRAM LANGUAGE
    English

    Viewer discretion is advised. This film contains Adult Language. This film may not be suitable for all audiences.

    View other UDocs films available to CBA members

 

CONTACT INFO

pd@cba.org 
613-237-2925; 1-800-267-8860 

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